Does Ruth’s Chris Steak House Use Sous Vide?

Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a well-known steakhouse with a legacy, is known for having some tender cuts of meat. But when it comes to their cooking method, some have speculated that sous vide is involved. So, does Ruth’s Chris Steak House Use Sous Vide?

No, Ruth’s Chris Steak House utilizes a wet aging process that can take weeks or months. The tenderness of their steaks comes from this extensive process.

Below, we will delve into the Ruth’s Chris Steak House cooking process and tell you some extra tips you can take home with you.

What is Ruth’s Chris?

Ruth Chris Steak House comes from the name of the owner, Ruth Fertel. In 1965, she purchased Chris Steak House in New Orleans. 

During the time of her ownership, a major kitchen fire broke out. The legend says she had the kitchen running within ten days but could not take the restaurant’s original name with her.

For a quick workaround, Ruth added her name to the title. Today, the legend lives on in this states-wide high-end steakhouse. 

Can You Make Ruth’s Chris Steak in Your Home?

When it comes to taking this delicious steak home, the process of cooking it as it is precisely done is impossible. This is because they use commercial-grade boilers, which is something at-home kitchens cannot create

However, you can replicate the process with high heat:

What Do You Need To Recreate A Ruth’s Chris Steak?

Photo of ruth's chris steak house

While you won’t recreate the aged beef process, you can still soften the meat using sous vide. In this case, Ruth’s Chris has a steak that is enhanced by garlic butter. So combine garlic and other seasonings in a sous vide bag to get started. 

If you are cooking a sous vide steak, you should stick with cooking a 2-inch steak for about an hour. If you have a larger steak, you’ll want to add another hour to that. 

Sous vide steak isn’t quite the dry-aging process you would expect from other steaks, but it is as close to wet aging that you can get in a short period. 

Once your sous vide process is done, you can add your butter to either side of it. If you have a broiler, you’ll want to put them in at 500 degrees. You can also use the broil settings on your oven. 

 If you want, you can also choose to sear the meat if you don’t have a broiler.

How Long Do You Broil Steak?

Since the steak is already cooked, you’ll want to use a meat thermometer to determine the current internal temperature. If the internal temperature meets your requirements, you can move on. 

The FDA recommends that the internal temperature of steak is at least 145. A steak at 145 is medium. Here’s a list of other temperatures worth hitting:

  • Rare steak is 125
  • Medium rare steak is 135
  • Medium steak is 145
  • Medium well is 150
  • Well done is 160

Anything higher is in the trash. 

What is Wet Aging of Meat?

Wet aging is the process of vacuum-sealing pieces of beef to prevent bacteria from accessing it. The meat is then stored inside of your fridge for up to six weeks

Chefs call it wet aging because the meat is allowed to sit in its juices. Because of this, it differs from dry aging. 

How Does Wet Aging Compare to Dry Aging?

Dry aging spends time in an open location. Unlike wet aging, dry-aging involves a humidity-controlled space in a dry room. 

In professional settings, the room is lit with UV lights that prevent bacteria. 

Once the meat is removed, the chef must cut off the outer layer because it is too dry to eat. It also (in some cases) might grow a bit of mold, which is harmless in later processes. 

How are These Aging Techniques Alike?

In both cases, they are meant to tenderize the meat, similar to sous vide’s water bath cooking style. Wet aging is closer to sous vide but typically tastes acidic due to being stored over time. 

On the other hand, sous vide food tastes like whatever seasonings you packed with it. Meanwhile, dry-aged meat tastes closer to a roasted and well-done flavor.

The three techniques have similar goals (tender meat) but different detailed results.   

Final Thoughts 

The Ruth’s Chris Steak House is a bit of a legend to those who love it. While they don’t use the whole vacuum sealer and boiled bag technique, this steak is still an excellent choice. 

Regardless of what technique you prefer, there’s no wrong answer when it comes to your favorite food. If you are looking for more sous vide tips and info, check out this guide on how to sear your sous vide food.  

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